Here is my April Reading Wrap Up and my ratings and thoughts about the books I read!

To All the Books I Read This Month: April

April 28, 2019

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Here is my April Reading Wrap Up and my ratings and thoughts about the books I read!

To All the Books I Read This Month: April

April 28, 2019

MY NAME'S KELSEY AND I'M A BOOK SLUT

Categories

Would I say my reading addiction is a problem?

Would you consider the fact that I've blown my daughter's future college fund on new books an issue? Cool, me either. I knew we'd be friends.

BOOK Love

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Here is my April Reading Wrap Up and my ratings and thoughts about the books I read!

I hope everyone had a great reading month!

I hit my book goal number-wise, but ended up swapping out three really long books on the TBR for much shorter books. If only we had unlimited time to read!

If you want some actionable tips about how to read more, check out the post How to Read More Books.

Here is my April Reading Wrap Up and my ratings and thoughts about the books I read!

Just a heads up, this post contains affiliate links—that means I get a small commission of any sales made from the links below, but the price is the same for you whether you purchase via my link or directly from Amazon 🙂

1. The Cheerleaders

Author: Kara Thomas

Genre: Young Adult | Psychological Thriller

Rating: 3 out of 5 Stars

Do I Recommend This?: Yes

Summary: In The Cheerleaders, a series of tragic events—all in the same month and on the same street—takes the lives of five cheerleaders. However, there’s no clear understanding of what actually caused their deaths.

Now, five years laters, Monica is searching for justice for her sister, one of the cheerleaders who died. She starts to suspect the way the stories are portrayed are not how they actually occurred. She takes on the almost impossible task of figuring out what happened all those years before, losing herself in the search.

Personal Thoughts About It: Based on its cover and title, I was expecting this book to be a lot creepier than it was. This is a true-to-form YA thriller. While the storyline kept me engrossed, it was pretty mild on all levels.

This book is a great choice for a light read or a palate cleanser.


2. The Silent Patient

Author: Alex Michaelides

Genre: Psychological Thriller

Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

Do I Recommend This?: Yes.

Summary: The Silent Patient is the story of a woman, Alicia, who’s been condemned to a mental institution for tying her husband to a chair and shooting him five times in the face.

However, no one is quite sure what the exact story is because Alicia hasn’t spoken a word since the crime happened.

Thankfully, Alicia has a dedicated therapist, Theo, ready to take on the challenge—and danger—of trying to heal her. Theo invests in Alicia deeply, examining his own life and flaws as he tries to get Alicia to open up about hers.

But Theo quickly crosses the barrier between patient and caregiver, diving way deeper into Alicia’s life than is healthy.

Personal Thoughts About It: This was a very entertaining and engrossing thriller. It had some unexpected twists that would make even the most seasoned thriller reader surprised!


3. The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls

Author: Anissa Gray

Genre: Contemporary Fiction

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 Stars

Do I Recommend This?: Yes.

Summary: The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls is the story of three sisters—Althea, Viola, and Lillian—and their complicated lives.

Althea is the oldest, having raised her younger siblings, the other two girls as well as their brother. Althea had always been strong willed and focused and being made to step in as the family matriach at such a young age further hardened that will.

But when Althea and her husband Proctor are arrested and sentenced to prison for seven years, the younger sisters have to step up to fill Althea’s shoes.

This story alternates between Althea, Viola, and Lillian, going through their current lives while also taking long looks back at their formidable years.

This is a strong story about family obligations, mistakes that grow more powerful than ever anticipated, and the complicated business of forgiveness.

Personal Thoughts About It: I thoroughly enjoyed the character development in this book. The individual characters were well-developed and the relationships between them were great as well. If you want a good family-saga story that focuses on sibling relationships, this is a good choice!


4. My Year of Rest and Relaxation

Author: Ottessa Moshfegh

Genre: Contemporary Fiction

Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

Do I Recommend This?: Yes

Summary: In My Year of Rest and Relaxation, the main character—never named—decides to spend a year asleep as much as possible.

Even though she has everything anyone could ever want—looks, money, an Ivy League education, and people falling all over her—she’s miserable. She decides the only way to save her mind from complete destruction is to medicate herself to the point of literal hibernation.

Abetted by an extremely unethical and possibly demented psychiatrist, our heroine gets her wish—to escape from the world through manufactured sleep while she figures out if eternal sleep is her end goal or if her year of rest and relaxation will be enough to renew her strength to return to the world.

Personal Thoughts About It: I was so surprised by how much I liked this book. I wasn’t expecting a lot from it based on the reviews, but it blew me away. It was dark and strange and moody. It reminded me a lot of The Virgin Suicides, which is my favorite book of all time.

But the thing I loved most about this book was the utterly perfect unlikeable main character. Most books that try to create an unlikeable character on this level fail miserably, but here it was done perfectly.


5. The New Me

Author: Halle Butler

Genre: Contemporary Fiction

Rating: 2 out of 5 Stars

Do I Recommend This?: No

Summary: The New Me is the story of aimless Millie and the lackluster life she’s fallen into.

Barely able to hold down her temp jobs, unable to survive without the dull noise of crime show reruns, and bored to death of her “best friend”, Millie’s life seems pointless. But when the chance at a full-time job surfaces, she realizes what she’s been missing.

As Millie begins to dream about her life once she is employed full-time, with a full-time income and more importantly, a full-time purpose, everything begins to makes sense.

She gets a brief taste of her new life, with new clothes, expensive and fresh food, and a best friend who relishes her company.

But when that opportunity leaves as quickly as it came, all her high hopes die, along with her motivation to work towards being a better her.

Personal Thoughts About It: This book was awful. It seemed forced and like it was trying to hard to fit into a certain box. I read it because it was compared to My Year of Rest and Relaxation and Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine, but it wasn’t even close to either.

I found myself rolling my eyes through most of this book. However, it did keep my attention enough to finish it to the end. And it was also a short and fast read.


6. Daisy Jones & The Six

Author: Taylor Jenkins Reid

Genre: Contemporary Fiction

Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

Do I Recommend This?: Yes

Summary: Daisy Jones & The Six is the story of how one of the most infamous rock n’ roll groups rose to ultimate fame in the 60s.

Of course it’s packed with sex, drugs, and rock n’ roll, but at its heart its a tender story of love, sacrifice, and loss.

The Six was a rock n’ roll band who was making awesome music and having a great time doing it.

Daisy Jones was a beautiful and wild girl, making her way through the glamorous world of 1960s Hollywood.

When a music producer realizes that the combination of Daisy Jones and The Six is a formula for guaranteed success, no one says no to the smell of potential fame.

It turns out—the producer was right. When Daisy Jones joins The Six, they become the most famous rock band of that age. But with fame comes responsibility they aren’t equipped to handle. The group ends up splitting up at the height of their fame. And no one knows exactly why until now.

Personal Thoughts About It: This book lived up to all the hype and more! The entire book is told in interview form, which ended up reading similar to a play.

This was such a special and enjoyable read; I highly recommend it to anyone, even if you aren’t a big fan of 1960s rock n’ roll.


7. Once Upon a River

Author: Diane Setterfield

Genre: Historical Fiction

Rating: 5 out of 5 Stars

Do I Recommend This?: Yes

Summary: In Once Upon a River, a little girl is found dead in the river at the advent of solstice. Just when everyone has accepted the terrible news, the little girl comes back to life.

This book follows the stories of multiple characters, their lives and aims all weaving in and out like (might I say it?) a river.

Everyone is enchanted by the little girl, wanting to take her into their homes and make her their own—and everyone has a different motivation for yearning so heavily for the girl.

The Vaughns, whose own little girl went missing from her bed two years prior, hold onto hope that this resurected little one is theirs, even though they have a sinking feeling it’s not her.

Lily, who is convinced it’s the ghost of her sister coming back to haunt her after what Lily had done.

The Armstrongs, who just found out about their oldest son’s daughter—their granddaughter—and believe this little girl might be their presumed missing grand daughter.

And Rita and Gaunt, two unnconnected people who find themselves pulled together thanks to the strange pull of the little girl.

Three little girls went missing in the river—and only one has been found. Who is she? Who does she belong to? And what happened to the other missing little girls?

Personal Thoughts About It: This is a true-to-form Diane Setterfield book—it takes some time to get into, but once you do, you’re hooked.

This book has all the charm of historical fiction, while having a twisty plot that will keep you entranced until the literal last page.

8. The Dreamers

Author: Karen Thompson Walker

Genre: Contemporary Fiction | Dystopian Fiction

Rating: 4 out of 5 Stars

Do I Recommend This?: Yes

Summary: In The Dreamers, an unidentified virus has come over a small town, starting at the college and soon spreading to the other members. The virus causes its victims to fall into a deep and unwakeable sleep.

No one can figure out how the virus is spreading, which means no one can figure out how to stop it. More and more members of the town catch it, falling asleep wherever they are. Eventually, the entire town is quarantined.

The uninfected members of the town must rally together as supplies dwindle and people continue to drop off one by one.

Just as hope seems completely lost, someone wakes up, convinced that what he saw while he was asleep was some form of reality.

Personal Thoughts About It: This was a hard book for me to rate. The story itself was compelling, but it was told from a distant perspective, which made it hard to truly connect with any of the characters.

However, this was a great book and written very well. I highly recommend it, even though it’s not a gripping story.

9. The Girl He Used to Know

Author: Tracey Garvis Graves

Genre: Contemporary Fiction | Romance

Rating: 4.5 out of 5 Stars

Do I Recommend This?: Yes

Summary: The Girl He Used to Know is the story of Annika and Jonathan—alternating between ten years ago when they were in college, first falling in love, and present day, rekindling the flame that was extinguished so suddenly all those years before.

Annika is a high-maintenance girl, although she doesn’t intend to be. She has special social needs and finds it hard to click with others. But when she meets Jonathan during her senior year in college, he seems to just get her.

They fall in love and have a wonderful relationship, until something tragically pulls them apart.

Now, ten years after college, they run into each other again, both having never lost those feelings from so long ago.

Personal Thoughts About It: I was so surprised by how much I loved this book. At first, I thought it was just a shameless copy of The Kiss Quotient, but I soon realized how wrong I was!

This was a sweet story that turned into a tear-jerker! I loved everything about it.

What books did you love this month? Share them in the comments below!



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MY NAME'S KELSEY AND I'M A BOOK SLUT

Categories

Would I say my reading addiction is a problem?

Would you consider the fact that I've blown my daughter's future college fund on new books an issue? Cool, me either. I knew we'd be friends.

BOOK Love

KINDLE DIRECT PUBLISHING

CHICK LIT WRITING ADVICE

popular posts

17 Books Totally Worth the Hype

9 Books to Get Completely Lost In

15 Books That Are Even Better as Audiobooks

7 Ways Kindle Short Reads Will Skyrocket Your Writing Career

FAm

Join the

SUPER JUICY BOOK NEWS AND PUBLISHING TIPS
DELIVERED WEEKLY

BOOKISH THINGS